What is the Oxford Comma (or Serial Comma)?

The Oxford (or serial) comma is the final comma in a list of things. For example: Please bring me a pencil, eraser, and notebook.

Example: I love my parents, Lady Gaga and Humpty Dumpty.
Without the Oxford comma, the sentence above could be interpreted as stating that you love your parents, and your parents are Lady Gaga and Humpty Dumpty.

Here’s the same sentence with the Oxford comma:

I love my parents, Lady Gaga, and Humpty Dumpty.
Those who oppose the Oxford comma argue that rephrasing an already unclear sentence can solve the same problems that using the Oxford comma does. For example:

Example: I love my parents, Lady Gaga and Humpty Dumpty.
could be rewritten as: I love Lady Gaga, Humpty Dumpty and my parents.

Source: What is the Oxford Comma (or Serial Comma)? | Grammarly

Sunk cost fallacy

Individuals commit the sunk cost fallacy when they continue a behavior or endeavor as a result of previously invested resources (time, money or effort) (Arkes & Blumer, 1985). This fallacy, which is related to loss aversion and status quo bias, can also be viewed as bias resulting from an ongoing commitment.

For example, individuals sometimes order too much food and then over-eat just to “get their money’s worth”.

Source: Sunk cost fallacy | BehavioralEconomics.com | The BE Hub